WD10EADS Showing 30mb only

first thought..is you little shitter

however, the following will fix it!

UBCD 4.4.1 or higher (http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/)

run the HDD Tools

-> MHDD32

-> use the Uncut tool, also known as NPHA? refer to help F1

Similar to this but a lot easier!

First Problem: Can’t convert Dynamic Drive back to Basic
– Installed Samsung HD103UJ terabyte drive
– Windows (XP SP3) wanted to make it a Dynamic Drive and I said OK.
– Bad move! Poor performance, like treacle when copying files
– I tried to repartition but discovered Dynamic doesn’t support them :-(
– I tried to convert back to Basic using Windows tools and also EASEUS Partition Manager but without success

Solution
1. Use gParted Live CD to wipe, repartition and reformat as NTFS
2. Problem solved. I chose two 480GB partitions as XP seems faster that way
3. Tell everyone “whenever Windows wants a Dynamic drive, SAY NO”

Second Problem: HD103UJ partition disappears, drive only 32MB
It had been working well, connected to an old Sil3114 SATA controller. I filled it with my stuff and retired the old drive as a backup. But next day for unknown reason, after reboot the new partitions vanished. Fortunately it wasn’t the system drive so I could still boot.

I tried messing with BIOS settings, reflashed Sil3114 and motherboard BIOS, reinstalled Sil3114 driver etc, all to no avail.

Solution
1. Download Samsung’s ES Tool. I burned the ISO image [1.86MB] onto CD.

2. Boot and run. ES Tool detected my Sil3114 card and HD103UJ no problem.

3. Under VIEW INFORMATION menu option the problem became evident:
Current Size 31 MB (LBA: 65134)
Native Size 953869 MB (LBA: 1953525168)

4. Under “SET MAX ADDRESS” menu option choose “Recover Native Size”.
NB. Don’t use “LBA MODE | Process” because that option needs to wipe your data.

5. Reboot. Drive reappears in all its 931.51GB of glory. Data is restored! :)

Mounting LV from USB Drives

Basically the crux of it is as follows. Remember it’s gotta be activated before mounting!

find it!

#fdisk -l /dev/sdb
Scan the drive with pvscan

#pvscan

Scan the drive with lvscan

#lvscan

activate it

#lvchange -a y /dev/volume

mount it

# mount -t ext3 /dev/volume/LogVol00 /mnt/somewhere

deativate when finished

#lvchange -a n /dev/volume

Mental note – don’t use LV, they suck and its more hard work…