Bundjalung and the Evans River

The Evans Head region is generally accepted as being an area of significant cultural and historical heritage for Aboriginal people. It is evident that the entire region, stretching North to Ballina, West to Casino and South to Iluka was an important gathering place for the Bundjalung people. The Goanna Headland and its surrounds is a significant site, being the subject of complex series of spiritual/creation stories located on the upper north coast and therefore of spiritual significance for the local Bundjalung descendants.

The Bundjalung people used to hunt, fish and gather shellfish from the river estuary and also utilised the diversity of plant foods available. Shell middens and flaked stone artifacts have been recorded and studied in the area reflecting the high use intensity.

Traditional knowledge indicates that the Evans Head area is also significant due to previous use as a ceremonial ground and for collection of orche from Red Hill. An 1840s massacre site is also located within the locality. The locality was used as a camping and holiday ground for Bundjalung descendants until the 1960s.

Staggerwing Vs Chipmunk

Beechcraft Staggerwing

The Model 17’s unusual negative stagger wing configuration (the upper wing staggered behind the lower) and unique shape maximized pilot visibility while minimizing the tendency to stall. The fabric-covered fuselageĀ  was faired with wood formers and stringersĀ  over a welded, steel tube frame. Construction was complex and took many man-hours to complete. The Staggerwing’s retractable conventional landing gear, uncommon at that time, combined with streamlining, light weight, and powerful radial engines helped it perform significantly better than other biplane designs.

In the mid-1930s, Beech began a major redesign of the aircraft, to create the Model D17 Staggerwing. The D17 featured a lengthened fuselage that improved the aircraft’s landing characteristics by increasing the leverage generated by the elevator. They relocated the Ailerons to the upper wings, eliminating any interference with the air flow over the flaps. Braking was improved with a foot-operated brake synchronized to the rudder pedals. These modifications enhanced the Staggerwing’s performance, which was soon put to the test under wartime conditions.

Dehavilland Chipmunk

The Chipmunk was designed to succeed the de Havilland Tiger Moth biplane trainer that was widely used during the Second World War. Wsiewolod Jakimiuk, a Polish prewar engineer, created the first indigenous design of the aircraft at de Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. It is an all-metal, low wing, tandem two-place, single engine aircraft with a conventional tail wheel landing gear and fabric-covered control surfaces. The wing is also fabric-covered aft of the spar. A clear perspex canopy covers the pilot/student (front) and instructor/passenger (rear) positions. CF-DIO-X, the Chipmunk prototype, flew for the first time at Downsview, Toronto on 22 May 1946 with Pat Fillingham, test pilot from the parent de Havilland company, at the controls[1]. The production version of the airplane was powered by a 145 hp (108 kW) in-line de Havilland Gipsy Major 8 engine while the prototype was powered by a 145 hp (108 kW) de Havilland Gipsy Major 1C.

The Model 17’s unusual negative stagger wing configuration (the upper wing staggered behind the lower) and unique shape maximized pilot visibility while minimizing the tendency to stall. The fabric-covered fuselage was faired with wood formers and stringers over a welded, steel tube frame. Construction was complex and took many man-hours to complete. The Staggerwing’s retractable conventional landing gear, uncommon at that time, combined with streamlining, light weight, and powerful radial engines helped it perform significantly better than other biplane designs.

In the mid-1930s, Beech began a major redesign of the aircraft, to create the Model D17 Staggerwing. The D17 featured a lengthened fuselage that improved the aircraft’s landing characteristics by increasing the leverage generated by the elevator. They relocated the Ailerons to the upper wings, eliminating any interference with the air flow over the flaps. Braking was improved with a foot-operated brake synchronized to the rudder pedals. These modifications enhanced the Staggerwing’s performance, which was soon put to the test under wartime conditions.

Glebe Tram Sheds -almost Graf heaven

Built in 1904 and once the second biggest depot in Sydney, the tram sheds housed up to 200 trams, servicing Glebe Point, Leichhardt and Balmain until 1958.

Sydney, the largest city in Australia, once had the largest tram system in Australia, the second largest in the Commonwealth (after London), and one of the largest in the world. It was extremely intensively worked, with about 1,600 cars in service at any one time at its peak during the 1930s (cf. about 500 trams in Melbourne today). Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, an average of more than one tram journey per day was made by every man and woman, infant and child in the city. Patronage peaked in 1945 at 405 million passenger journeys. The system was in place from 1861 until its winding down in the 1950s and closure in 1961. It had a maximum street mileage of 181 miles (291 km), in 1923.

Current zoning prevents use of the tram sheds for anything other than recreational activities.

woot…

Augusta Lighthouse

yeah..not Augusta the helichoppers eh..

Built from 1895 to 1896 the tower and cottages are built of local limestone.

The Cape Leeuwin Light was first mooted in 1881, but took 15 years to eventuate.

Disputes raged over the best site for the lighthouse. Also, until the Kalgoorlie-Coolgardie gold rushes Western Australia was the poorest State, and with no assistance from the Eastern States, it was unable to proceed with a project of this size.

Further delays occurred when it was found the the initial test bores that showed bedrock at 2.5 metres had only found a rock shelf and it was then necessary to excavate to 6.7 metres.

The original 1895 plan included two lights. The present high white light tower and in front of it, a low red light tower. Although the foundations for this low tower were completed, the structure was never built because it was considered that a second light would cause confusion and draw ships closer to the Cape.

Sydney University Vs Gordon

Union that is :) I have been meaning to check out one of these games for some time, given how close they often areĀ  there is no excuse for not getting there.

Conditions were certianly difficult, for both players and myself :) Pushed the poor old camera to its limits and really made the crucial error of leaving many images under exposed which really affected the noise that is clearly apparent in teh images. These were typically taken at 1/750s or 1/500s iso 800 or iso 1000 and f4 (all 300mm), the lighting was basically stadium floodlights, it was so overcast and wet the lights did more than the sun, not to mention it was a 3pm game…

Nonetheless, I will be back for more and hopefully under better ligth and conditions.

couple of useful links:

Tooheys New Shute Shield draw for season 2010.

Sydney Womens Rugby